Are unfamiliar names an impediment to college and work success In an short essay of 2-3 pages, write

Are unfamiliar names an impediment to college and work success

In an short essay of 2-3 pages, write a literary summary on the “name” topic.

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Please use the examples from these two readers

Just kinda summarize the ideas in these two  articles with the theme like

“A name is not only a sign to represent a person, but also can reveal the cultural background, gender, his parents’ expectation etc. It will probably affect a person’s whole life”

Here’s another long article from the book”freakonomics”…but I think it is too long for you to read..and it takes time:D If you need this resource, I will post it.

So here’s an sample essay that you can read through….please help me write this short summary in this format, you can use the ideas and examples in this essay, but you need to paraphrase it ! especially those cited source. And you can change the order of the sub-points.

If you have any further questions, please feel free to lemme know.

What’s in a Name? A Job!

Are unfamiliar names an impediment to college and work success?

Published on May 11, 2012 in Pyschology Today

This post was written by Claire Liu, a Williams College sophomore psychology and art history major from New York. This is the third in a series of student essays.

College acceptance week was difficult for me; I opened many envelopes that made my heart sink, only to encounter a classmate proudly sporting his or her new sweatshirt of the college the next day. As the rejections piled up, I sometimes wondered if anything had specifically set me back. I share this story not to complain about my own experience, but to suggest a set of psychology phenomena that may play a significant role in impression formation.

Colleges do not require applicants to reveal their race or ethnicity, but for me, and for many other college hopefuls, the of our ethnicity was made apparent from the very first piece of information that was required: our names.

Names provide a wealth of information. They offer cues to identifying an individual’s , ethnicity, and class, among other features. A University of Chicago study by showed that some names can serve as an impediment to economic success. The field experiment they conducted randomly assigned either African American sounding names such as DeShawn or Shanice or white sounding names like Cody and Caitlin to resumes responding to help-wanted ads in Boston and Chicago (). Black names were 50 percent less likely to elicit a callback than white names with comparable resumes. Furthermore, improvements in credentials caused a 30 percent increase in the likelihood of eliciting a callback for white sounding names, but only 9 percent for black sounding names.

may be responsible for these findings, but there’s another scientific explanation as well: . The , accounting for the “positive affective state” attributed to stimuli with high fluency. One subtype of processing fluency is phonological fluency—how easy it is pronounce a word.

A new study indicates that name pronunciation may influence the formation of impressions; called this the “name-pronunciation effect”. They suggested, “…easy-to-pronounce names (and their bearers) are judged more positively than difficult-pronounce names.” This finding is not specifically about race; people like Mr. Smith more than Mr. Colquhoun. Essentially, we’re inclined to like people with familiar names. They get a head start, in life as well as in the college and professional application process.

Fluency helps explain the Bertrand and Mullainathan (2004) findings: White names may be more fluent, to some application reviewers, than black names. Outright racial bias may have played a role as well.

Through my four years at a predominantly white high school, few people were able to pronounce the combination of the three letters that make up my last name. Looking back, my college application experience is just another remote series of obstacles of the past, and I’m lucky that it brought me to Williams. But do others also get that lucky? The name-pronunciation effect makes it evident that processing fluency can determine which direction an initial impression goes. The question, however, remains: is it a result of fundamental human cognitive processes, or a window into racial biases?

 

………………………Answer   preview…………………….

“A name is not only a sign to represent a person, but also can reveal the cultural background, gender, his parents’ expectation etc. It will probably affect a person’s whole life”
It is beyond doubt that a name reveals an individual’s culture, ethnicity, race or even religion. Parents name their children with an aim of making them unique or encouraging them in life by naming them after famous individuals……………….

APA

580 words

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